Python - Integers

An integer (from the Latin integer meaning "whole") is a number that can be written without a fractional component. For example, 21, 4, 0, and −2048 are integers, while 9.75, 5½, and √2 are not. The latter are known as floats.

In Python, integer assignment is as simple as:
(from the shell)

>>> x = 5
>>> y = 6
>>> print(x * y)
30  

Python maintains the types of variables and does not let you mix types when performing operations. This will throw an error:

x = 6  
y = 'This string'  
print(x + y)  
Traceback (most recent call last):  
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError:  unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'int' and 'str'  

However, you can get away with this, Python allows it:

x = 2  
y = 'Python is Awesome'  
print(x * y)  
Python is AwesomePython is Awesome  

But this would throw another type error:

x = 2.5  
y = 'Python is Awesome'  
print(x * y)  
Traceback (most recent call last):  
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError:  can't multiply sequence by non-int of type 'float'  

Because x is a floating point number.

Craig Derington

Espousing the virtues of Secular Humanism, Libertarianism, Free and Open Source Software, Linux, Ubuntu, Terminal Multiplexing, Docker, Python, Flask, Django, Go, MySQL, PostgreSQL, MongoDB and Git.

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